A Day in Vermont
December 7, 2015

Comments

Mineral Springs Park

There’s something in the water in Middletown Springs.

The Indians and early settlers knew it. Eventually the “healing and therapeutic mineral water” was bottled and sold in 1868.

All I know is that there’s a lot of nice people here… and it works exceptionally well for painting watercolors.

Enjoy the new video below!

Size: 11X14 (auctioned unframed)
Medium: Watermedia on panel

Order Print

And the winner is…

Each month I give away a free print (winner’s choice) to one random Day in Vermont subscriber.

Congratulations to our December winner, Bernie Galster of Rome, NY. Bernie chose “Silver and Gold” and had this to say…

“We are thrilled to be the winner of a print. Our choice is “Silver & Gold” which we fell in love with when Peter first shared it in Dec. 2014. It reminds us of a large ancient crabapple tree in our yard in the Adirondacks. When we first met Peter and his art, we commissioned him to do a painting for our son who works in Rutland, VT. We love our Adirondacks and our visits to our son in Vermont. Both places give us a sense of tranquility, peace, & harmony (sounds like a good description of Peter’s art). We wish we could clone Peter for the Adirondacks.”

29 Responses to “Mineral Springs Park”

  1. Steve Gilzow

    Love this painting and process! I also — when possible — use nearby water when painting outdoors; the ingredient becomes the subject. I have a tent identical to the one you use here; would never have thought to go to the trouble of setting it up for shelter while painting. And, I like the “authenticity” comment at the end. With Artistic License, we can move mountains. A small aside (the annoying retired teacher speaking); the green on the trees looks to be lichens, not moss.This was very inspirational, Peter. Thank you!

    Reply
    • Peter Huntoon

      Thank you Steve, yes I always go the extra mile for authenticity, a good painting…and the camera. You are correct of course…beautiful blue-green lichens!

      Reply
  2. Rebecca Rimson

    Once again, you transport me to Vermont from my home in the northern California redwoods. I’ve got a studio where you can stay and capture some of the beauty of God’s country of the west! (Of course, Vermont is God’s country of the east.) Thank you for the beauty you reveal.

    Reply
    • Peter Huntoon

      Thanks very much for the comment, and invitation to paint California. As soon as I finish with everything I want to paint in Vermont I’ll come see you. It may be a while. 🙂

      Reply
  3. Susan Zilke

    What colors do you typically use for your initial wet washes? Are they granular? Also, do you typically use like an Ampersand board to paint on? Maybe something a little slippery and that holds the moisture well as you paint? Thank you for doing the videos. You are a really good marketer, which most artists lack. The snow makes me glad I live in Virginia – brrr!

    Reply
    • Peter Huntoon

      Sounds like you already know the answers Susan…yes, granular pigments that lift easily like Cobalt Violet…yes Ampersand aquaboard or (slippery) clayboard panel. Thanks very much for the marketing compliment. I prefer the word “Sharing” rather than “Marketing”. It’s a subtle shift in thinking and approach, but an important one. Instead of worrying about “selling”, I work hard to simply do my very best work, share that work with kindred spirits and nice people like you, and give as much as possible. (like the videos) Every artist must find their own path that works for them, and I’m grateful to be gradually finding mine!

      Reply
  4. Kathy Stephenson

    I LOVE watching go around the state and do your paintings!! Always in the most beautiful places!! Thanks for sharing your talent with us!!

    Reply
    • Peter Huntoon

      Thank you very much Kathy, it is a whole lot more fun for me too to have some good company along on this little adventure!

      Reply
  5. Randy Priest

    I love when you include a video. Your videos instantly transport me from New Jersey to Vermont. It takes me 8 hours to drive there and that’s if it isn’t snowing. What is the story with the old bottle you are holding in the photo?

    Reply
    • Peter Huntoon

      That’s an old (circa 1868) bottle that was used to bottle that Mineral water from Middletown Springs. Back then you didn’t need FDA approval to claim something was “Therapeutic or Medicinal”. Apparently the “proof” came from a couple of industrious locals who claimed the water helped with their ailments. Surely, they had no personal interest or anything to gain! Thanks Randy!

      Reply
  6. Rosemary Moser

    Nice late fall color capture, Peter! A favorite place of mine here in town!

    Reply
  7. Katherine Marquis

    What a joy it is to see late Autunm in Vermont! I grew up in East Poultney and have lived in the South for the past 30 plus years. I will never forget the magic of Vermont! I don’t get to visit as often as I would like to, but do get back when I am able.
    Have you ever done a print of the church on the Green in East Poultney? I would love to see that.
    Thanks! Katherine

    Reply
  8. Brian Dugan

    Great video as always Peter. I remember going to get that water when I was a kid. Very special memories. If you ever make it to Northern California to paint, you should also come to Northern Nevada. But I can’t imagine ever running out of places to paint in Vermont.

    Reply
    • Peter Huntoon

      The more I paint, and the older I get, I gradually have come to accept that I’ll never be able to explore and paint everything I would like. I therefore must do my very best with those few I can, and savor each bite. Thanks Brian, and Happy Holidays from Vermont!

      Reply
  9. Margaret Griffin

    Love this snowy day!!! Can you believe that we, here in the Adirondacks, don’t have any snow yet??? I need some snow for my Christmas spirit…this helps and it is just so pretty. Thank you Peter Huntoon, love all your paintings!

    Reply
    • Peter Huntoon

      Thanks very much Margaret, I am going to bet that you will have at least a little bit of snow before Christmas. Happy Holidays!

      Reply
  10. Brian Blaine

    I too love the beauty of lichens and mosses, especially after their colors are heightened by rain. What else especially caught my attention this week was the wonderful composition which led my eye skillfully from the road, to the shelter, to the brook, up the hill to the left, across the top, and, through a couple of well placed branches, back to the shelter. So well done, and with such atmosphere and serenity!

    Reply
    • Peter Huntoon

      I’m honored yet again by the nice comment from a fellow artist, Brian. Composition is of course so important in fine art, and the good news for anyone just starting out is that composition is a skill that can be learned. Eventually it becomes almost automatic, as anything less than good composition screams….”Fix Me!”

      Reply
  11. Knellee

    I love the video. Do more of these please – great for our little budding artists at home to see you in action.

    Reply
    • Peter Huntoon

      Glad you and the young artists at home are enjoying the videos Knellee. I am discussing with Daniel (video) possible ways to keep doing them on a regular basis, such as sponsorship.

      Reply
  12. cynthia adams

    Peter…I echo many of the comments/ praise of your latest art. I am especially taken by the architecture of the springhouse! What a beautiful spot for all seasons. Video and history are very interesting. Thank you…Cindy

    Reply
    • Peter Huntoon

      You are very welcome Cindy, thank you. Sharing the creative experience makes it that much more meaningful and fulfilling.

      Reply
  13. Armond

    It was great seeing you in Manchester this past Saturday. My wife and I really enjoyed it. Thanks for taking the time!

    Reply
    • Peter Huntoon

      My pleasure Armond, what a nice day it was. Thanks very much for all your support!

      Reply

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