A Day in Vermont
September 14, 2015

Comments

Moss Glen Falls

There are two different “Moss Glen Falls” in Vermont.

One in Granville and another farther north, in Stowe.

Apparently they were named before Google research was possible.

This Moss Glen Falls is carved into the Granville Notch along Rt 100 between Hancock and Warren.

It’s a stunning stretch of Green Mountain wilderness and pristine natural beauty.

“If there is magic on the planet, it is contained in Water.” – Loren Eiseley

Enjoy the New Video below!

Size: 11X14 (auctioned unframed)
Medium: Watermedia

Order Print

20 Responses to “Moss Glen Falls”

  1. Francesca

    Loved the video! So interesting to watch how you use so many techniques. The print is lovely!

    Reply
  2. Michele Cummings

    This is one of our favorite Vermont scenes. Beautifully done. Thank you.

    Reply
    • Peter Huntoon

      I love that whole stretch through the notch…I could spend a year there painting every day and never get bored. It has a magical feeling to me. Thanks Michele!

      Reply
    • Peter Huntoon

      Thanks David, the water is low and slow right now. Hopefully we get more rain soon.

      Reply
  3. Joann

    I love watching you paint! Your use of color is beautiful. What paper did you use for Moss Glenn Falls to make it so easy for you to lift of the paint to get those whites back again?

    Reply
    • Peter Huntoon

      I often use Ampersand Aquaboard (textured) or Clayboard (smooth)…a rigid substrate that eliminates the task of stretching paper…pretty much a necessity when you paint as saturated and wet as I do. Lifting is relatively “easy” too.

      Reply
  4. Brian Blaine

    Wow! This painting is so ALIVE! I visited the falls about ten years ago, and this painting brought me back there like it was yesterday. The video reveals what I believeto be the main secret to its success, big brush, bold strokes! Thank you once again for sharing.

    Reply
    • Peter Huntoon

      Thanks as always Brian for the insightful comments from an artist’s perspective. Yes, Big brushes and bold strokes get to the heart of that matter quickly, avoiding a fussy slog into details. Kind of like talking. It’s important to say enough, but very easy to say too much.

      Reply
  5. Muriel Brown

    Just beautiful! And it is just as wonderful to watch you create it in person and then see the finished masterpiece. We also loved the music accompanying the video. Dan and Anne do a great job filming the whole process.

    Reply
    • Peter Huntoon

      Thanks so much Muriel! Yes, Daniel and Anne do a great job condensing the painting experience into a few minutes of music and video. They are true artists as well.

      Reply
  6. Rick

    AWSOME SAUCE!!! Love the purple and the movment of the water……remember ol friend….. a rolling stone gathers no moss……. Keep on rocken Peter your ART work always cheers me up. Rickster.

    Reply
    • Peter Huntoon

      Thanks a lot Rick. I may be gathering a little weight and rolling a bit slower, but no moss!

      Reply
  7. Jan&Gary Friedland

    Peter you are amazing!! Look forward to your magnificent paintings and videos each time. They are great.
    Fondly, Jan&Gary

    Reply
    • Peter Huntoon

      Hi Christine, as usual, I used transparent watercolor with the one addition of white gouache. As I add white to the transparent colors of course this makes them translucent to opaque, depending on how much white is added to the mix. Note that transparent watercolor dries lighter, but colors mixed with white dry darker. The more white you add to the mix the darker it dries as compared to how it looks wet. Like Ed Whitney said, “If it looks right when it’s wet, it’s wrong.” 🙂

      Reply

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