A Day in Vermont
December 18, 2017

Comments

End of the Line

Like many an old Vermonter, the old caboose is chock full of character and charm.

This one sits next to my friend Johnny Hinrichs’ shop on Rt 7A in Sunderland.

It’s a good way to end the year as 2017 passes on through.

I’ll take next week off and see you back here on Monday, January 1.

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!

Size: 12X16 (auctioned unframed)
Medium: Oil on linen panel

Order Print

And the Winners Are…

Each month I draw two random Day in Vermont subscribers to win a free print of their choice. It’s one small way I can say thanks for your tremendous support.

Our first winner for December is Virginia Philo of North Chittenden, VT. Virginia chose “Cow Crossing” and had this to say…

“I’ve decided on Cow Crossing as it represents Vermont to me. When I was a little girl there were more cows than people in Vermont. When I first moved to Vermont in my 20s I stayed with a family on their dairy farm in Shrewsbury. I loved the life, and I was sometimes the one to bring the cows across the road at milking time. This particular print depicts the Vermont life that drew me here. The blue chicory in the foreground is one of my favorite roadside wildflowers. I’m so excited to have one of your exquisite prints. Thank you so very much.”

Our second winner is Terry Perugini of Mystic, CT. Terry chose “November Reflections” and had this to say…

“I chose November Reflections because it’s a Vermont lake scene with such detail, variations in color, and beautiful reflections.  I’ve been going to Vermont about twice a year all my life to visit family. We never run out of new places to explore. Lake Bomoseen is now on my go to list. I enjoy receiving A Day in Vermont to see Peter’s new work and watch the videos of his process.”

28 Responses to “End of the Line”

  1. Noka Garrapy

    Peter ~
    please consider posting a small version of the pictures your winners choose, to remind all your visitors of that specific picture. Or perhaps a link to that specific picture.

    Reply
    • Peter Huntoon

      Hi Noka, yes, if you hover your mouse over the print title above ie “Cow Crossing”, there is a link there for you. Tx!

      Reply
  2. cynthia adams

    Many significant people worked the caboose and had a lot of responsibility. Glad to see this Vt. icon in a prominent spot. THANK YOU. Happy Trails…. and Merry Christmas .

    Reply
  3. Sherry

    This painting reminds me of my late husband. Jon was an avid train lover because he grew up within the yards of the Rutland Railroad where his dad worked. He would often drop everything, gather our two dogs in the car, and take off for the nearest crossing when he heard the distant whistle telling him a train was coming. Not far from our home stands the remains of the East Clarendon Depot and a caboose – last used as a small restaurant and snack bar, but sadly now shuttered and offered for sale.

    Reply
  4. Brian Dugan

    Peter, thanks again as always for the great start to my week with a much needed dose of Vermont. Merry Christmas.

    Reply
  5. MaryJames

    I love your paintings. I love the breadth & variety of your subjects. Here you are painting in rural Vermont but each canvas feels new. I’m never bored.

    Reply
  6. Ruthe Gobin

    I love this train and all trains. They remind me of being a little girl back in Vermont playing near the train tracks and climbing in the box cars. I also loved walking on the train tracks to get to my fathers ice fishing spot. I’ve lived in NH for many years now so I love seeing your pictures of Vermont where my heart will always be! Your paintings are all beautiful and it’s hard to really have a favorite.

    Reply
  7. Joan Ward

    That is great. A caboose like that sat on the tracks in Proctor for years!
    Happy Holidays to you and your family!

    Reply
  8. Joan Ward

    A caboose sat on the railroad tracks like that for years in Proctor! It is wonderful to go back in time!
    Happy Holidays to you and your family!

    Reply
  9. Brian Blaine

    To me, warm colors of the caboose speak of the pleasant memories of years ago when I’d watch a passing train near my uncle’s house in Windsor, Vt., and anticipate its trailing caboose. The darkening sky and somber background landscape, seem, in contrast, to emphasize the subject’s enduring and resigned , yet rugged nature as it now sits in silence, its wheels without motion and in kinship with snow and ice.

    Reply
  10. Martha Welch

    Peter, your painting generates a reflection of life ……
    As we all never know when the caboose of life will be
    Around the next bend…..
    Around the next bend

    Our last

    Reply
  11. Doris Michel

    And so it is, Peter. The end of the line remains the end. Only a lonesome part of the line, symbol of traffic, prosperity and connections between cities is standing in the snow. There is no traffic anymore. The years go by and at least we reach the of our own line. The artifacts will remain. Happy new year, Peter.

    Reply

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